The 12 Anime of Fall 2019 You Should Be Watching

The anime industry churns out a new selection of productions every three months like clockwork, and in a similar fashion we here at AniTAY follow up two months later with our favorites of the current anime season. There’s a ton of content to sift through each cycle, and I imagine that for most of you it is not possible (or desirable, for that matter) to check out every new show in hopes of finding the very best. Inevitably, good stuff slips through the cracks and we waste our time watching things that turn out not to be a good match for our viewing tastes.

That’s where this project comes in. Our writer team at AniTAY pools some of the greatest and most terrible minds within the anime fandom from across the globe. Every season we debate which shows we should include in our seasonal recommendation list, and the result is this article. You may not find your personal list of favorites to be perfectly in-line with ours, but if you’re looking for a new series to check out that you might have otherwise missed, this is the blog for you. If you just came here to yell at us, that’s fine too as long as all your complaints are addressed to AniTAY admin Dexomega.

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Finally, some notes before we get started:

  • 1) As always, we have omitted continuing shows and sequels. Only new stuff here. Check out our spring sequel guide below for information about sequels.
  • 2) Similarly, only shows available for legal streaming are considered. Netflix has complicated what the word “available” means, but we still consider limited-availability shows such as Netflix originals for this list.
  • 3) We included a “where to watch” section, but keep in mind that our listings are based off availability in the United States.
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After School Dice Club

Written by: Koda

Genre: Game, Slice of Life

Where to Watch: FUNimation, Hulu

Spoiler-free Synopsis: Miki Takekasa is an introverted high school girl without any friends and also struggles with understanding the concept of what it means to have fun. One day after school she runs into her classmate Aya Takayashiki, and after a minor accident, the two spend the rest of the day just wandering around town until they find another classmate of theirs named Midori Ono. They follow Midori as she enters a store called Saikoro Club, which specializes in tabletop games. Midori introduces the two of them to the incredible world of tabletop games by playing the game Marrakech. Realizing just how thrilling and enjoyable it feels to have fun, Miki decides she wants to keep playing these kinds of games with her newfound friends.

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Why You Should Be Watching: On the surface it would be rather easy to dismiss this series as one where all they do is show off a new game every episode and otherwise do typical “cute girls doing cute things” shenanigans, but it is so much more. Nearly every aspect of After School Dice Club radiates a deep and devout love for its subject matter. This comes through primarily in the games the show focuses on, which are all genuine real-life European board and card games. After School Dice Club goes to great lengths to replicate the games it features from giving a tutorial of the rules to painstakingly recreating all the art and game pieces.

Moreover, the show has a strong passion regarding the virtues of tabletop games that should resonate with anyone who has spent time at their local game shop making new friends over a few rounds of Catan or Ticket to Ride. There is a reverence for the craft of tabletop gaming, from the very creation of these games to the bonds they can foster, that I often find missing in a lot of these slice of life shows focused around a specific hobby or profession. If you’ve ever painted miniatures or have fond memories of the clattering of d20s, After School Dice Club is a love letter to you and yours.

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Recommended by: Koda, Requiem, TheMamaLuigi

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Ascendance of a Bookworm

Written by:
Aoi Yamamoto

Genre: Isekai, Fantasy, Slice of Life

Where to Watch: Crunchyroll

Spoiler-free Summary: A young bibliophile gets the dream of a lifetime in a library...only to die and reincarnate in the body of a sickly little girl in a medieval town. The kicker? Paper and books are a luxury that few can afford, so our heroine must learn to make her own books and introduce this world to future inventions like shampoo and pancakes.

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Why You Should Be Watching: The isekai genre finally gets a series with a strong female protagonist with a goal NOT of being queen of the world or defeating monsters, but only to find a way to create books so she can live her dream. This is a good alternative to those that are bored with the current run of isekai series and want something more light-hearted to watch. Also, Myne (because the books have her spelled as Myne not Main) is a cutie whose growth throughout the series is both fun and sad, especially in the times that her illness limits her. However, it looks like the series is about to explore more of what exactly ails Myne at the show’s halfway point, promising additional depth and possible feels on top of its comfy and light-hearted atmosphere.

Recommended by: AoiYamamoto, Edmundton, Gugsy, Kinksy, Reikaze, Requiem, Stínolez, TheMamaLuigi

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Babylon 

Written by: Doctorkev

Genre: Procedural, Suspense, WTF

Where to watch: Amazon Prime

Spoiler-free synopsis: Based on the novel series by Mado Nozaki (KADO - The Right Answer), Babylon follows public prosecutor Zen Seizaki as his investigation into a corrupt pharmaceutical company escalates to encompass shady politics, experimental sociology, ethical conundrums, and horrifying violence.

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Why you should be watching: Babylon, one of this season’s four adult-oriented Amazon Prime shows, should come with a strong content warning from the outset. It does not, so I was relatively unprepared for what transpired in the most recent episode 7 (which does come with a warning). Babylon holds the record for the most upsetting anime scene I have ever witnessed.

What begins as a dry procedural evolves by the end of episode 3 into something quite bonkers and thought-provoking. Main antagonist Ai Magase is a primal male fear made flesh - a beautiful but predatory female with the ability to make any man putty in her hands, to violate their minds or to make them take their own lives with a smile on their face. Her smile and demeanour are incredibly creepy and Babylon is worth watching to find out what deranged crime she’ll commit next.

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Similar in structure to a US crime procedural like Law and Order, but examining far more extreme subject matter, it drops hints of the supernatural that could equally turn out to have rational explanations. Thematically, Naoki Urasawa’s Monster would be the closest anime example with its examination of the nature of Evil. From a medical standpoint, I find the very culturally Japanese viewpoints regarding the show’s exploration of legalised suicide fascinating. The show keeps its cards close to its chest, so I’m unsure what its ultimate message will be about this loaded subject.

Almost completely devoid of humour but stylishly directed with clever use of colour and editing, Babylon is a serious watch and a show that rewards attentive viewing. This is not something one can follow while tapping away at a gacha game. Note-taking and repeated watching may also be recommended. Be warned that the latest episode is extremely upsetting and for better or worse, episode 8 has been delayed until December 30th. If you don’t mind expending the effort and risking your sanity, try something with more substance than Empty—headed Isekai #463. Just don’t expect comfortable escapism.

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Recommended by: Dark Aether, Doctorkev, hybridmink, Kinksy, TGRIP, TheMamaLuigi

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Beastars

Written by: TGRIP

Genre: Highschool drama

Where to Watch: Japan, Netflix come January

Spoiler-free Synopsis: In a world populated by anthropomorphized animals, Beastars follows the life of high school student and drama club member (and gray wolf) Legoshi. Following the murder of a fellow student, Legoshi’s school is set on edge with a rift forming between the school’s carnivore and herbivore students. As this happens, Legoshi has a chance encounter with a small rabbit student named Haru, which sets off a series of conflicting feelings between the two in what is a tense time for Cherryton Academy.

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Why You Should Be Watching: If you’re thinking this is something in the vein of Zootopia or even Bojack Horseman, I’ll have to stop you right there because while this does delve into some of the same themes as Zootopia, and it is on the same streaming platform as Bojack, Beastars sets itself far apart for many good reasons, key among which is its animation. Studio Orange became well known back in 2017 for their production on Land of the Lustrous, and Beastars has amazingly enough outdone even that show to become what is probably the best-looking CG anime ever made. This is achieved not only thanks to cutting edge and impeccably directed CG animation, but also thanks to Orange’s deft hand that knows when to have traditional 2D supplement areas where CG wouldn’t be the best option. Beastars deserves a watch because it is so well made that you never find yourself wondering what it would look like if it was 2D animated instead.

Thankfully, though, Beastars is far from being a one trick pony. Underneath the incredible production and direction is one of the best dramas of the year, with Beastars not only delving into heavy topics like sexuality and stand-ins for race and hierarchy in society, but basic stuff like students figuring out themselves and others. Legoshi is easily one of my favorite protagonists of the year too, thanks to not only fantastic voice acting, but also how he’s written, being a character who all at once has confidence and strength, but also empathy and a very recognizable sense of uncertainty about himself. It should be said though that there isn’t a weak character anywhere in this show’s cast, from Legoshi to Haru to the drama club’s star Louis to Legoshi’s childhood friend Jack. Each not only has an engaging personality that makes you care about them, but they also interact with one another in ways that make you want to follow them as they live their lives.

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It should be said though that Beastars isn’t a full-on drama like My Youth Romantic Comedy SNAFU; while that is its primary characteristic, the show also has a great sense of humor that comes in when it’s most appreciated, and the show can be physically brutal at times when high school students act like, well, high school students. And of course, there is the whole mystery of who was responsible for the inciting incident… Overall, though, Beastars deserves attention not only because it’s one of the best produced shows of the season, but also one of the best written and directed, too.

Recommended by: Doctorkev, TGRIP

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Blade of The Immortal

Written by: Requiem

Where to Watch: Amazon Prime

Genre: Drama, Historical, Violence, Revenge Tale

Spoiler-free Synopsis: Young teenage girl Rin Asano’s life was destroyed when her father’s swordsmanship dojo was destroyed and her parents slaughtered by a group of swordsmen named the Itto-ryu. Unable to move on or make peace with this injustice, she seeks revenge and to kill the men who ruined her life. But how can a young girl with incomplete training kill skilled swordsmen? By enlisting the aid of an immortal samurai named Manji, a man who has the blood of hundreds of opponents on his hands and bizarre “bloodworms” that will not allow him to die, of course. Thus, the two embark upon the path of vengeance…

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Why You Should Be Watching: Blade of the Immortal is a show that defies easy description. On paper, its seems a simple plot: girl wants revenge, girl finds man willing to kill for her, and then a great number of people die horribly bloody deaths. This is accurate to a point; the bones of the narrative are fairly uncomplicated. It’s in the execution that Blade truly shines.

Things in this show are never as simple as black and white, these are good guys and these are bad guys. Blade’s story lives in the murky grey areas of morality. It’s a revenge story that constantly questions the righteousness and legitimacy of revenge. Rin just wants justice for her slain parents, but the path to it is littered with moral compromises and unintended consequences. Is the violence worth it if it just begets more violence? Does the killing end the story, or just perpetuate a cycle of an eye for an eye until everyone is blind? The show handles all these questions brilliantly, with subtlety rather than beating you over the head with it. It succeeds by being emotionally evocative, drawing you into these characters and their struggles, their pain.

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The characters themselves are handled deftly. Rin is the innocent struggling with learning the rough truths of the world she inhabits, and Manji is the world-weary warrior, desperate for the purpose and form of redemption that aiding Rin in her quest may provide. But the series does not stop at making you understand and identify with its protagonists; it gives equal care to what are ostensibly the villains. No characters in Blade of the Immortal are simple or one dimensional; perhaps the best example being Anotsu himself. He and his Itto-ryu commit terrible acts, but the show takes pains to show you his perspective and journey.

On top of all this, the show looks amazing and stands just as accurate an adaptation of the original manga visually as it does narratively. Its elegiac violence is beautiful even when it’s at its most brutal, and make no mistake, the world of Blade is brutal and unforgiving, where terrible things happen to people who deserve it and those who don’t in equal measure. The camera never shies from the violence, which is over-the-top without ever becoming ridiculous. The sound design and music are also standouts that serve to make the world even more engrossing, and features an outstanding OP.

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Blade of the Immortal isn’t just the best show this season; if it sticks the landing it could well go down as one of the all-time greats. So gather your resolve, and walk the path of blood and steel.

Recommended by: Dark Aether, Doctorkev, Gugsy, hybridmink, Kinksy, Requiem, TGRIP

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Cautious Hero: The Hero is Overpowered but Overly Cautious

Written by: Koda

Genre: Action, Adventure, Comedy, Fantasy, Isekai

Where to Watch: FUNimation, Hulu

Spoiler-free Synopsis: Ristarte, the Goddess of Healing, is a relatively minor deity who has recently been selected to save the world of Gaeabrande, an S-Class level task. As a result, Ristarte must be very particular about the mortal she spirits away from Earth as her chosen hero to aid her in this journey. After scouring massive piles of potential Japanese heroes, she settles on selecting Seiya Ryuuguuin, a seemingly cold and calculating man with the highest starting stats she’s ever seen. Ristarte is determined to get this grand journey started, granting Seiya everything a hero could ever need to begin, but she overlooked one major flaw on his character sheet; he’s overly cautious about everything.

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Why You Should Be Watching: Everything about Cautious Hero is laser focused on turning almost every single aspect of your typical isekai adventure on its head. Despite being the hero the title is referring to, Seiya is functionally not actually the main character, as one might expect. Instead, the show is almost constantly from Ristarte’s perspective. We very rarely get any internal monologues from Seiya, often only learning about his thought process behind his actions from him verbally sharing it to the rest of the cast after he had already carried it out. Additionally, unlike a lot of isekai that tend to just automatically grant the protagonist immense power when they arrive in a new world, Seiya genuinely works for his overpowered powerups.

Therein lies probably the funniest thing about Seiya: he is a total badass, but all his abilities and skills were gained to mitigate any risk to himself, and in doing so has the accidental effect of taking all the fun out of the adventure for Ristarte as well. Speaking of Ristarte, she is far and away the show’s biggest star and is easily by herself why anyone should watch Cautious Hero, as she is like a more competent Aqua from Konosuba. Full praise must be given to Ristarte’s voice actresses, Aki Toyosaki and Jamie Marchi, for giving wonderful performances that truly bring to life this goddess’s selfish and petty nature. For anyone who has grown tired of the recent seasonal churn of isekai titles, Cautious Hero: The Hero is Overpowered but Overly Cautious might just be the kind of twist to the formula you need.

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Recommended by: Dark Aether, Edmundton, Kinksy, Koda, Protonstorm, Reikaze, Requiem, Tenshigami, TGRIP, TheMamaLuigi

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Didn’t I Say to Make My Abilities Average in the Next Life?!

Written by: Reikaze

Genre: Isekai, Slice of Life, Comedy

Where to Watch: Crunchyroll

Spoiler-free Synopsis: Misato Kurihara is an exceptional girl, standing out because of her excellence in grades. As a result, however, she has been isolated from the rest of her peers— a thoroughly not regular life. However, thanks to Truck-kun, she gets isekai’d with her wish of being “average” granted.

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She’s reborn as Adele von Ascham, the daughter of a noble, and in her desire to live a normal life, she leaves her home and enrolls at a hunter school in a faraway kingdom using the name “Mile”. Many shenanigans ensue thanks to her OP nature, quirky personality, and unique party members.

Why You Should Be Watching:
Average is tried and true, an otaku being isekai’d into a regular fantasy world (with nano-machines) while being incredibly overpowered, but this show’s appeal isn’t story or originality. Average is more slice of life than isekai and as such, it succeeds in spades. Primarily a comedy created out of absurd situations due to the characters quirky personalities or from the relationships between characters, it’s always a pleasant and entertaining experience. It’s not going to blow your mind away, but it’s the light-hearted fun show I always look for in an anime season, and is enjoyable throughout.

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PS: The OP is really catchy. I could listen to “waho waha” all day :)

Recommended by: Kinksy, Reikaze, Requiem, Stínolez, Tenshigami, TheMamaLuigi

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Kemono Michi: Rise Up

Written by: Edmundton

Genre: Comedy, Fantasy

Where to Watch: Funimation, Hulu, Amazon

Spoiler-free Synopsis: From the author of KonoSuba comes Kemono Michi, starring Genzou Shibata as a pro-wrestling star known as Animal Mask who fights alongside his trusted canine sidekick, Hiroyuki. During the most important match of his career, he is summoned to another world in order to save a kingdom from the looming threat of demonic beasts. However, Genzou’s extreme love of animals leads him to abandon this mission and focus on raising the very demonic beasts he was tasked with destroying. What follows is a hilarious adventure as Genzou tackles the demonic beast problem with his own brand of wrestling-infused love alongside his new sidekicks: the wolf-human Shigure, the hungry dragon Hanako, and the loser-vampire Carmilla.

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Why You Should Be Watching: At the center of Kemono Michi’s comedy lies Genzou’s love of animals (he is very clearly an extremely open furry, scaly, and whatever else you’d lump in there). This ridiculous premise works because of the contrast between the huge pro wrestler Genzou Shibata (likely a reference to real-life wrestler Katsuyori Shibata) and his deep love for animals. While other adventurers want to kill the beasts, Genzou just wants to warmly hug them and embrace them, allowing him to tame them through the power of love (read:brute force). I’ll admit, Genzou’s antics can sometimes border on being problematic but the show’s tone and comedy keep it from feeling meanspirited. And while Genzou’s antics are the main draw, the rest of the cast are also able to pull their own weight so far — not quite as strong a band of misfits as KonoSuba’s but decently fun all the same.

Finally, I do have to admire some of the series’ smaller nods to wrestling. As mentioned before, the name Shibata is probably a reference to the real-life wrestler; furthermore, some of the poses and actions done in the show also reference real life aspects of wrestling. And somehow the studio always knocks it out of the park animating the actual wrestling segments. As a fan of wrestling and anime, Kemono Michi hits all the right marks for me and that makes it an easy recommendation.

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Recommended by: Dark Aether, Edmundton, Kinksy, Koda, TGRIP

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Null & Peta

Written By: TheMamaLuigi

Genre: Comedy, Sci-Fi, Slice of Life, Short

Where to Watch: Crunchyroll

Spoiler-Free Synopsis: After the death of Peta, her older sister, young genius scientist Null creates a high-tech robot imbued with her late sister’s personality. But, there’s one problem: something about Robo-Peta is just off from how Null remembers her sister. Thus begins the hilarious and heartfelt hijinks as Null tries to love and deal with her new “sister,” while Robo-Peta just tries to cook a decent meal!

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Why You Should Be Watching: It’s not often that we recommend shorts for our readers. They’re usually too short to have any impact, becoming nothing more than one-joke, three-minute distractions. Well, fear not: Null & Peta is five minutes an episode! More importantly, within those five minutes it manages to balance entertaining humour with two endearing main characters, creating a show that’s equal parts comfy comedy and a heartfelt coming-of-age story.

Regarding the titular characters, Null and Robo-Peta play incredibly well off each other, with the former acting as straight-person to the latter. Much of their interactions work because of the stellar work done by their voice actresses, with Robo-Peta mixing the typical “older sister” voice intonations with a static, robotic tone. Null, on the other hand, is appropriately bombastic, flustered, or subdued as per her personality and the specific scenario. Moreover, the art and animation are delightful to behold with vibrant, pastel tones and poppy movement. It’s a show where its technical elements are a large part of what make it shine.

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But let us not forget that Null & Peta is first and foremost a comedy! Running jokes like Robo-Peta’s cooking or her overbearingness would normally wear thin, but they endure and through the visual hilarity of a Baymax-esque robot carrying the comedic weight. Episodes in space, on the beach, and on the road to Null’s school help keep things fresh and provide new ground for her and Robo-Peta’s back-and-forth routine to provide more laughs.

Underneath its comedic exterior, Null & Peta also gestures towards a darker side that, as of episode six, is just starting to emerge. There are hints of a larger plot or conflict brewing, a sense that something in this pastel world just isn’t right. More interestingly, at least for me, is the show’s exploration of Null’s aforementioned grief towards Peta. In a vein similar to Sakuta’s complicated feelings towards his younger sister in Rascal Does Not Dream of Bunny Girl Senpai, Null struggles to conflate her “new” sister with her memories of and experiences with the “old.” Though her character trajectory seems fairly clear, it nonetheless remains engaging and yet another reason this short sets itself apart. Null’s emotional journey towards accepting this new sister created by her own hands raises questions around what it means to grieve and move forward, and how we engage in those acts. Covering that exploration in a veneer of comedic hijinks emphasizes the net positive of grief reconciliation, how we can laugh while we cry and cry while we laugh.

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Recommended by: Doctorkev, Kinksy, TheMamaLuigi

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No Guns Life

Written by: Dark Aether

Genre: Cyberpunk, Mystery, Noir, Action, Seinen

Where to Watch: Funimation

Spoiler-free Synopsis: In the aftermath of a great war, humanity was left with the technology to extensively modify their bodies with cybernetic parts. Having completed their service, many of these cyborgs, called Extended, turned to a life of crime to make ends meet. Juzo Inui is a former soldier turned Resolver; a private eye who investigates Extended-related incidents. When a rogue Extended crashes into his office with a boy in tow, he pleads for Juzo to protect him from the organization that controls the city. With no memory of his own past or how his head became a gun, Juzo’s life is about to become more complicated.

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Why You Should Be Watching: The series that likely caught quite a few people’s interest with its over the top premise, No Guns Life had a few extra rounds hidden within its revolver. Set in a cyberpunk world with much of its population composed of cyborgs called “Extended,” Juzo Inui is a wise cracking private investigator who takes a straightforward approach to his work and life.

From the start, NGL evokes a sense of familiarity for cyberpunk fans, immediately hitting most of the common tropes in the first few episodes while embracing the absurdity of its world. Though the genre has been a popular subject in everything from recent films, TV, and video games, the way it handles themes such as body modification and the influence of corporate interests can be hit or miss depending on the approach. NGL spends a significant amount of time establishing that its cybernetic community is human, with the Berühren Corporation currently being the sole entity that sees them as disposable tools. It’s this back-and-forth dialogue between Juzo and the people caught up in this conspiracy that reflect the state of the world and reinforce that you still need to be able to (in Juzo’s words) “wipe your own ass” even if society will not acknowledge you.

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Of course, NGL is still very much about a guy with a gun for a head making witty remarks and being a badass. Suffering from amnesia, Juzo as a character is not terribly deep, but his cynicism and hard truths almost immediately come back around in some fashion, whether to make an observation or simply introduce some levity in between fighting the evil conglomerate. The second episode, for example, sees Juzo come up empty on the hunt for his favorite brand of cigarettes; a gag that’s played up even as the villain shows his hand. A literal smoking gun, NGL is not about subtlety, but it’s this bizarre approach between hardboiled detective turned unlikely guardian that somehow works in the show’s favor.

Despite its outward appearance and no-nonsense attitude, No Guns Life (much like its hero), is quickly escalating into something much bigger: child trafficking/experimentation, an organization hell bent on retrieving one of its “assets,” and the private eye himself caught in the middle with no knowledge of his own history.

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Recommended by: Dark Aether, hybridmink, Kinksy, Koda, Requiem

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Stars Align

Written by: Gugsy

Genre: Drama, Sports

Where to Watch: Funimation, Hulu

Spoiler-free Synopsis: The girls soft tennis club is incredible — they just won nationals! But the boys soft tennis club is a mess, being listless, aimless, resultless, and on the verge of getting shut down. The student council is aiming to shut down clubs that aren’t performing and redirect funds elsewhere, and the boys soft tennis club is first on the list.

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Enter Maki Katsuragi, the new transfer student. He was childhood friends with the president of the boys tennis club, Toma Shinjou, but had moved away and now returns. Initially reluctant to join, Maki is eventually convinced to join and lift the spirits and fortunes of the boys tennis club. But the boys’ personal troubles and problems with their families threaten to bring their hopes down with them!

Why You Should Be Watching: While this may sound like your typical run-of-the-mill sports-centered anime, Stars Align is actually much more focused on the personal dramas of each of the boys. All of them have their own struggles outside of the club, and the show is much more rewarding because of its realistic portrayals of these struggles. That it does this without falling back into melodrama speaks to the work done by the excellent staff at 8bit. It makes each moment, whether heartbreaking or moving, that much more special because it is so grounded in reality and the genuine events that happen to people everywhere. Whether the boys actually save the tennis club isn’t as consequential as the growth of each boy individually, and that won’t be an easy thing for any of them. It’s doubly impressive because Stars Align is an anime original so it has no source material to fall back on but the vision of its writer and directors, and so far, they are handling this show with a great level of care.

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A special shout out to the show for how it handled the controversy with its ED. It featured various members of the cast dancing, but it was later revealed that the choreography was lifted from original dances online without proper credit. But the studio swiftly went back and cited the original creators in the credits without much fuss. An expertly handled matter in a show and story that is similarly being handled with great care.

Recommended by: Dark Aether, Gugsy, Koda, Protonstorm, TheMamaLuigi

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Welcome to Demon School! Iruma-kun

Written by: Stinolez

Genre: Comedy, Demons, Supernatural, Fantasy, School, Shounen

Where to Watch: Crunchyroll

Spoiler-free Synopsis: Suzuki Iruma has been sold to the demons by his irresponsible and greedy parents. To his surprise, he’s transferred into the Demon World and adopted as grandson by the very demon who bought him. From that moment onwards, Iruma is attending a school in the Demon World.

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Why You Should Be Watching: This anime looks like a kids show, but it somehow works for all ages, with the main cast being one of the reasons it works so well. You have a wide variety of characters from pushover Iruma, noble Asmodeus, to funky Clara who’s constantly on the move and thinking about fun ways to spend her time playing with her friends. The show well balances the complexity of its jokes from basic slapstick to more involved ones - like what happens when a human, instead of other demons, uses his demon teacher sigil for a familiar summoning ritual. It’s enjoyable to watch how Iruma as a single human among demons attending the schools tries so hard to be invisible, just to fail miserably every time. Also, don’t skip the opening song, it’s a banger!

Recommended by: Dark Aether, Edmundton, hybridmink, Requiem, Stínolez, Tenshigami

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This article was a collaboration by many members of the AniTAY community. Some wrote part of the final article, and several others took part in voting and discussion over the past couple of months.

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Contributors in Alphabetical Order:


If you enjoyed this article, please check out our collaboration from last season here:

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You’re reading AniTAY, the anime-focused portion of Kotaku’s community-run blog, Talk Amongst Yourselves. AniTAY is a non-professional blog whose writers love everything anime related. To join in on the fun, check out our website, visit our official subreddit, or follow us on Twitter.

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