In a somewhat puzzling move, the Japanese government has signed a new bill into law which outlaws the creation, publication, and distribution of licentious media (generally referred to as ‘ecchi’ content) depicting two or more non-minor partners.

Yes, non-minors.

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe issued a press release today detailing the bizarre new law and its consequences, which include fines for publishers and jail time for creators of light novels, manga, and anime depicting adults engaging in sexual activity (or the insinuation thereof) with other adults. Abe also explained some of the circumstances that drive the decision, pointing to recent psychological studies that show significant correlation between loli content and sexual excitement among Japanese men, especially between the ages of 20 and 65, as well as shota content affecting women from the ages of 30 through 50. The law is apparently intended to encourage older citizens to seek out younger partners in order to bolster the still-declining birthrate.

As of this writing, this law has been denounced by nearly every other nation (with the surprisingly unsurprising exception of Saudi Arabia). American leadership has yet to comment officially, though President Trump retweeted several loli doujin announcements for the upcoming Summer Comiket event. Top analysts believe that the doujins (and original tweets) being in Japanese wasn’t an issue for the President because “he can barely read English anyway, so he probably just liked the pretty pictures.” Meanwhile, more civilized countries such as Bangladesh and Yemen are declaring Japan’s new law a global humanitarian crisis, urging the UN and NATO to take action.

Advertisement

Abe speaks about the bill: “Look, I’m not saying it was weebs, but... WEEBS.”

Oddly enough, the bill banning ecchi of persons over the age of majority did not itself get a majority of votes, but was pushed through with a plurality. We don’t particularly want to consider what that means for the “or more” clause in the bill itself.